Conference

Speaker Highlights

Chief Technologist - Industrialization at GE Aviation

Technology Lead - Data Driven Materials R&D at ExxonMobil

Senior Manager at SABIC Ventures

VP of Innovation at Huntsman Advanced Materials

Lead Applications Scientist - Advanced Materials at Croda

VP Technology at SCS Coatings

CEO at Cerion Nanomaterials

Principal Scientist at IDTechEx

Director General at Nanotechnology Industries Association

CEO at Molecular Rebar Design

EVP, Technology and R&D at HZO Inc.

CEO at Gerdau Graphene

Director of Sales at InProcess-LSP

Director of Business Development at CHASM

Global Lead - Energy Storage at Morgan Advanced Materials

CEO at Group14

CEO at Epic Advanced Materials

CEO at BNNano

CEO at Graphene Council

Key:
Wednesday, 13th, October - Track 1: Property-Led Materials Innovation
Wednesday, 13th, October - Track 2: Safely Manufacturing Advancing Materials

The past 18 months have been undeniably challenging for many businesses and few have escaped unscathed; but for those now emerging into the ‘next normal’, there is an opportunity to reshape their future, and with it, the global landscape. 2021 is set to provide a watershed moment – of how things were pre-COVID 19 and post-COVID 19. This disruptive change must be handled with agility by those involved in, or reliant on, material and energy resources, to ensure that we take advantage of the opportunities it brings and avoid the inherent pitfalls such as increasingly resource hungry products. The pandemic has accelerated key macro trends: there is a renewed focus and determination to place sustainability front and center; digitalization has taken hold rapidly, from consumer behavior to manufacturing operations; and innovation has been pushed into the spotlight as a fundamental part of the toolkit underpinning global recovery. How materials users and producers handle this dynamic movement will set them up for exponential success or possible failure.

For advanced materials businesses and their customers, the imbalances and weaknesses in supply chains, laid bare by the pandemic, are now starting to be redressed, favouring those businesses open to sustainable models and digital transformation. This session will get to grips with these new challenges and outline the most exciting possibilities for those with a stake in the success of advanced materials.

Key topics for discussion:

  • Which global changes are having the greatest impact on materials innovation? How can these be turned into opportunities?
  • What does the push for net-zero outputs mean in reality for US materials manufacturing?
  • Is the current model of innovation fit for purpose? Can current development timelines meet the need for disruptive clean innovation and if not what changes are needed?
  • How can companies of all sizes embrace digitalization in manufacturing?
  • What is needed from governments and regulators to drive economical and sustainable materials innovation?

Speakers

11:35 am

Short Break
11:35 am - 11:50 am

The past 18 months have been undeniably challenging for many businesses and few have escaped unscathed; but for those now emerging into the ‘next normal’, there is an opportunity to reshape their future, and with it, the global landscape. 2021 is set to provide a watershed moment – of how things were pre-COVID 19 and post-COVID 19. This disruptive change must be handled with agility by those involved in, or reliant on, material and energy resources, to ensure that we take advantage of the opportunities it brings and avoid the inherent pitfalls such as increasingly resource hungry products. The pandemic has accelerated key macro trends: there is a renewed focus and determination to place sustainability front and center; digitalization has taken hold rapidly, from consumer behavior to manufacturing operations; and innovation has been pushed into the spotlight as a fundamental part of the toolkit underpinning global recovery. How materials users and producers handle this dynamic movement will set them up for exponential success or possible failure.

For advanced materials businesses and their customers, the imbalances and weaknesses in supply chains, laid bare by the pandemic, are now starting to be redressed, favouring those businesses open to sustainable models and digital transformation. This session will get to grips with these new challenges and outline the most exciting possibilities for those with a stake in the success of advanced materials.

Key topics for discussion:

  • Which global changes are having the greatest impact on materials innovation? How can these be turned into opportunities?
  • What does the push for net-zero outputs mean in reality for US materials manufacturing?
  • Is the current model of innovation fit for purpose? Can current development timelines meet the need for disruptive clean innovation and if not what changes are needed?
  • How can companies of all sizes embrace digitalization in manufacturing?
  • What is needed from governments and regulators to drive economical and sustainable materials innovation?

Speakers

Despite the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Nanotechnology is projected to grow at CAGR of 9% between 2020-2027, reaching $70.8bn, with nanomaterials making up the largest segment. Seemingly unlimited applications, government support and the increasing recognition of their unique properties are all significant positives, whilst regulatory restrictions and the complexities and costs of development and production are currently barriers to growth. Finding the route to the tipping point for widespread uptake is still not guaranteed, at least in the short term and tackling the real or perceived downfalls in the technology will hold the key to success.

The US is still the dominant force in nanotechnology and nanomaterials, with 30% of global revenue and 80% of the market based there, but with Asian markets growing rapidly, the race is on. This session will outline both the opportunities and barriers for nanotechnology and nanomaterial uptake, with leaders discussing industry-wide challenges in investment, costs, manufacturing capabilities, complexity, sustainability and application – we are at the start of the J curve and there is much to do but, as these sessions will demonstrate, the rewards are high!

* This session starts with leadership discussion featuring open conversation between industry leaders on the key topics and audience Q&A followed by a market forecast talk from Richard Collins at IDTechEx

Leadership panel discussion – Key topics:

  • Which factors are key to widespread uptake of nanotechnology and materials and how close are we to achieving them?
  • Is the regulatory outlook positive? If not, how can this be changed to encourage innovation and growth?
  • The commercialization challenges are well documented for nanotechnology; but at an industry level, what can be done to overcome them?
  • Innovation is key to a material’s success but is industrialization being considered enough at the early design stages? Does the industry as a whole need to change processes to ensure commercial success?

Speakers

1:10 pm

Short Break
1:10 pm - 2:10 pm

Despite the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Nanotechnology is projected to grow at CAGR of 9% between 2020-2027, reaching $70.8bn, with nanomaterials making up the largest segment. Seemingly unlimited applications, government support and the increasing recognition of their unique properties are all significant positives, whilst regulatory restrictions and the complexities and costs of development and production are currently barriers to growth. Finding the route to the tipping point for widespread uptake is still not guaranteed, at least in the short term and tackling the real or perceived downfalls in the technology will hold the key to success.

The US is still the dominant force in nanotechnology and nanomaterials, with 30% of global revenue and 80% of the market based there, but with Asian markets growing rapidly, the race is on. This session will outline both the opportunities and barriers for nanotechnology and nanomaterial uptake, with leaders discussing industry-wide challenges in investment, costs, manufacturing capabilities, complexity, sustainability and application – we are at the start of the J curve and there is much to do but, as these sessions will demonstrate, the rewards are high!

* This session starts with leadership discussion featuring open conversation between industry leaders on the key topics and audience Q&A followed by a market forecast talk from Richard Collins at IDTechEx

Leadership panel discussion – Key topics:

  • Which factors are key to widespread uptake of nanotechnology and materials and how close are we to achieving them?
  • Is the regulatory outlook positive? If not, how can this be changed to encourage innovation and growth?
  • The commercialization challenges are well documented for nanotechnology; but at an industry level, what can be done to overcome them?
  • Innovation is key to a material’s success but is industrialization being considered enough at the early design stages? Does the industry as a whole need to change processes to ensure commercial success?

Speakers

Critical components such as oil rigs, satellites, planes, medical devices, biosensors and boats all operate in harsh or potentially corrosive environments requiring the most durable materials and strongest build quality to ensure that they can go the distance. Failure is costly on an economic basis, but given the sensitive nature of their local environments, failure can be catastrophic for the local ecosystems, whether that be an ocean or a human being! 

Advanced innovation in coatings is providing some exciting possibilities when it comes to developing lightweight, long lasting, heat and corrosion resistant coatings for harsh environments and this session will outline the considerations, the hurdles yet to be jumped and the promising innovations in coatings for harsh environments.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key questions for discussion:

  • What are the primary considerations for materials in harsh environments?
  • What are the pitfalls with incumbent coatings materials?
  • Which innovations in process and product are showing the greatest promise for aviation, oil and gas rigs, marine and space applications?
  • Is there comparison between the harsh environments of the body and large scale infrastructure projects? Could something be learned from each to the other?

Speakers

The challenge of commercializing new materials is well documented but as of yet, remains a problem. With a process that can often take ten years or longer, the kind of investment and resource required is often beyond the reach of the average start-up armed only with IP and an exciting idea or design. It is prohibitively expensive to develop good products and costs well into the millions if not billions of dollars once both the design process and the manufacturing facilities are counted. This often feels unachievable for small companies and start-ups.

Managing the innovation cycle is also a challenge for large companies too, understanding how to work with start-ups, academic institutions and even each other in order to validate and maximise the expertise and ideas out there in an organised and coherent manner. This session offers an opportunity for investment experts to discuss investment strategy, sharing their own challenges and interests and offering the same opportunity to those small company representatives looking to make themselves heard in a busy marketplace.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key questions for discussion:

  • Does the IP system need to change to encourage innovation?
  • Critical considerations when pitching a material-centric investment
  • How to manage commercialization as a highly disciplined system
  • What is the solution to commercialization challenges for start-ups?
  • Deal structuring and expectations (desired returns, key milestones, follow-on rounds and exit horizons). How do investors and large scale companies see the challenge being solved?

Speakers

3:20 pm

Short Break
3:20 pm - 3:30 pm

The challenge of commercializing new materials is well documented but as of yet, remains a problem. With a process that can often take ten years or longer, the kind of investment and resource required is often beyond the reach of the average start-up armed only with IP and an exciting idea or design. It is prohibitively expensive to develop good products and costs well into the millions if not billions of dollars once both the design process and the manufacturing facilities are counted. This often feels unachievable for small companies and start-ups.

Managing the innovation cycle is also a challenge for large companies too, understanding how to work with start-ups, academic institutions and even each other in order to validate and maximise the expertise and ideas out there in an organised and coherent manner. This session offers an opportunity for investment experts to discuss investment strategy, sharing their own challenges and interests and offering the same opportunity to those small company representatives looking to make themselves heard in a busy marketplace.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key questions for discussion:

  • Does the IP system need to change to encourage innovation?
  • Critical considerations when pitching a material-centric investment
  • How to manage commercialization as a highly disciplined system
  • What is the solution to commercialization challenges for start-ups?
  • Deal structuring and expectations (desired returns, key milestones, follow-on rounds and exit horizons). How do investors and large scale companies see the challenge being solved?

Speakers

Billions of electronics devices have been deployed in the past decades and the number is increasing annually  – each needing safe, economical, sustainable and lightweight materials that can deliver ever greater performance and withstand the impact of moisture, corrosives, temperature extremes and electrical activity.

Conventional materials are often too thick and porous for increasingly miniaturized devices and not sustainable enough for regulations compliance. Moreover toxic, non-biodegradable chemicals will soon no longer be viable for component protection. Manufacturers are already making changes and nanomaterials can provide some of the solutions. This session examines the needs of electronics manufacturers, the material considerations and the potential solutions and challenges for this key industry.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • Which nanomaterials are set to have the greatest impact on electronics? Where are there still gaps in innovation?
  • What part can nanomaterials play in enabling the Internet of Things? Flexible gadgets and ever smaller integrated circuits and where do the remaining technical barriers lie?
  • What changes for materials requirements when meeting the unique needs of medical grade electronics devices?
  • Can nanocoatings deliver lightweight cables to enable for electric flight?
  • What is the sustainability profile of nanocoatings and other nanomaterials in the face of mounting ewaste?

The potential applications for advanced materials and nanotech could be globally transformative, particularly for the wellbeing of humans, for example: nano-enabled agriculture could help to reduce the predicted 800m people hungry by the end of the decade through nano-enabled agritech; nanocoatings have been shown to have unique antimicrobial and antiviral properties in the face of the coronavirus – and nano-enabled drug delivery is showing enormous potential for revolutionizing healthcare. But for all these potential positives there are substantial concerns around the safety of these new materials and technologies, particularly when they come into contact with the food chain or the health system. In response, the U.S. Government has funded nanotechnology environmental health and safety focused research at a rate of between $58 and $77 million per year, taking the total since 2005 to $1.34bn invested.

 

This session sets out to understand the scale and severity of risks from new materials and tech; outlining what the systems are for regulating new materials before addressing the affirmative action that the industry, government or regulators should be considering to improve both the safety and the reputation of exciting and promising new advanced material and nano-enabled technologies.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • Do we have a clear understanding of the risk in working with or using nanomaterials and nanotechnology?
  • What are the latest regulatory changes for nanotechnology?
  • Are current provisions and instruments capable of tackling advanced materials and nanotechnology? 
  • What can we do now to better prepare regulations that inspire innovation rather than restrict it?
  • Is the industry doing enough to ensure advanced material safety? What more could be done?

Speakers

Key:
Thursday, 14th, October - Track 1: Property-Led Materials Innovation
Thursday, 14th, October - Track 2: Reducing Complexities in Materials Manufacturing

Li-Ion batteries have been the accepted battery technology for many years now and will likely remain the incumbent design for the coming decade at least. But a step change is needed to improve the performance, cost and desirability of EVs. Batteries need to charge faster, without degradation, cost less and last longer whilst matching internal combustion engines for power and energy density.

There are many areas of the design and development process that materials and nanotechnology stands to contribute and this session will deliver a whistle stop tour of the best and brightest innovations whilst gathering some industry heavyweights to discuss

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • What can we expect from nanotechnology in the development of better performing cells? Could it hold the key to solid state technology?
  • In order to move away from rare earth materials, what are the alternatives for cell manufacturers?
  • Can we expect a step change in performance in the next decade and if so which material is likely to deliver it?
  • Is process or product more important to new materials in battery performance/ durability/ cost?

Speakers

Whether taking a top down or bottom up approach, the challenges of producing and scaling a nanomaterial or nanotechnology brings both really exciting potential and numerous challenges, with cost and consistency sitting at the top of this tree. So how can businesses of all sizes look to design and manufacture at the nanoscale and what are the considerations that underpin successful scale up?

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • How can manufacturers develop a blueprint for nano manufacturing set up that can be repeated?
  • What are the biggest challenges preventing businesses from breaking ground in nano manufacturing and how can they be overcome?
  • Could using existing infrastructure hold some of the answers to expediting manufacturing and reducing cost?
  • What can materials designers do to improve the manufacturability of their products earlier?

Speakers

10:35 am

Short Break
10:35 am - 10:45 am

The current global shortage of semiconductors is on track to cost the world’s automakers $110bn in revenue this year, almost twice previous estimates and this is just one industry. Almost every area of life is touched by semiconductors, from the chips in cement, signalling that it is hard and thus safe, to the crucial chips throughout the electronics systems in your car, phone, laptop and internet systems. As a result the global shortage has left manufacturers scratching their heads on how they can avoid this situation in future – there is no simple answer.

This is a prime opportunity for materials innovators to step up and demonstrate alternatives, showcasing new materials entirely, or new ways of using existing materials that are easy to manufacture and that could stand to simplify an inordinately complex manufacturing process and reduce the potential for future shortages. This session will showcase some promising options and open discussion on the strategy and implementation needed from materials manufacturers. 

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • What are the challenges in developing new materials for semiconductors? What is needed?
  • What are the considerations in taking a material from concept to commercial application and deciding which one is best suited? For example:
    • Performance properties
    • Material costs and abundance of supply
    • Location of supply
    • Validation techniques and tools
  • What are the challenges in scaling up materials R&D to semiconductor application?
  • Where are the most exciting and promising developments at the moment in advanced materials for semiconductor applications?

Nanotechnology simultaneously holds a reputation for showing great promise across almost every area of innovation and industry, whilst also being seen as difficult to grasp, integrate and work with. This means a headache for nanotechnology and nanomaterials producers as the technology matures and reaches commercial potential across a much broader range of applications. We need a step change in the understanding and receptiveness of end users in some areas alongside some careful strategy from the producers to ensure that the consistency of performance is there from products and the help needed to integrate any nanotech or nanomaterial, is readily at hand.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics: 

  • Is discrete sales the route forward or will the complexity of nanotechnology and materials naturally always need a materials as a service type of approach?
  • How can nano manufacturers make it easier to understand integrating nanoproducts?
  • Do the below steps hold the key to successful relationships with end users and do nano producers cover off these areas enough?
    • Rational design, discovery, and generation and synthesis of building blocks required for function, assembly, and organization
    • The building processes for assembly and integration
    • Developing the science of scale-up and establishing the fundamentals of functionality via unique capabilities in characterization techniques paired with theory and modeling.

Speakers

Modern thermoplastics and composites can compete with traditional materials like aluminium on almost every factor including cost, weight, corrosion, heat resistance and more. However, both types of complex material present challenges environmentally and amongst growing pressure to develop resource-efficient, economical and sustainable solutions combined with a renewed push for electric flight the whole life impact of complex polymers and composites has become a key consideration.. This session will showcase some of the most exciting innovations and applications alongside some of the current barriers facing aerospace designers and their materials suppliers.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • What are the sustainability challenges for aerospace composites and polymers in the face of increased climate change pressures?
  • Do advanced materials stand to enable electric flight and which materials show the greatest promise? 
  • What are the likely materials needs of new or changing aerospace applications like flying cars, hydrogen, drones and satellites?
  • What new materials are making an impact on aerospace and what are the barriers to their inclusion?

Product innovation is moving at a rapid pace, and manufacturing needs to adapt and become more agile in order to move with it. This is a costly business and taking a completely new, digital and integrated approach to both design and production could bring benefits across the board of sustainability, cost and performance. 

This works both ways and design for manufacturability should be an integral part of the design process, however the traditional techniques such as casting and coating might need to be diversified in favour of a digitally managed approach. This would enable more flexibility and control in the material composition and morphology and would allow for greater integration horizontally and vertically and in some cases can deliver better functionality and freeform materials.

This session will seek to outline how existing companies can pivot their own manufacturing capabilities and also what completely new production methods are set to transform this key but costly stage of the commercial process.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • The constructive application of digitalization – how can those on a small budget compete with data, IIoT, AI and machine learning investments of big manufacturers?
  • Which processes look set to transform how we manufacture materials?
  • Does digital manufacturing equal sustainable manufacturing?
1:00 pm

Short Break
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

After water, concrete is the most widely used substance on the planet. But its cost and strength benefits cover huge dangers to the planet and human health and there are further concerns around its durability. As urban populations grow so does the use of concrete – but corrosion, aging, and extreme conditions can adversely affect traditional building materials and there is a critical need for multi-functional, high-performance building materials to help advance the sustainability, durability and safety of 21st century infrastructure.  

However, there is a potential cost to these new materials too. The plastic issue is well known, with more than 400 million tons of plastic wastes estimated to be produced each year, but with any complex polymer, composite or complex advanced material the challenge of what to do with it at the end of life and the sustainability of its production is substantial. This session provides a chance to hear from sustainability and innovation pioneers, sharing ideas on new materials that are set to form part of the solution to more sustainable construction, but also discussing the strategies needed to tackle the sustainability of these materials too.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions 

Key topics:

  • What are the biggest sustainability challenges in construction materials and where can we find the low hanging fruit in reducing their impacts?
  • Do advanced materials offer a more sustainable solution given their well known issues when it comes to recyclability?
  • Can complex materials be truly sustainable?
  • Which materials are making an impact on the sustainability of traditional materials (e.g. graphene in concrete?)

Speakers

To fuel continued innovation, researchers want to deepen their understanding of the physical and chemical properties of materials (morphological, structural, magnetic, thermal, and mechanical) from the macro- to nanoscale. Innovative characterisation methods focus on developing techniques to study material properties in a variety of ways to gain data and insight – and then a different set of techniques to accurately translate that data into a useful form, techniques vary both in the physical analysis and then in the theory and modelling utilized to interpret results. 

The challenges are numerous, how do you characterize a material as it is designed, produced, manufactured, transported and applied to ensure consistent performance? How can these often incredibly expensive machines be best utilised? Mastering all these challenges could guarantee materials standards and potentially increase consumer trust in a material.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • Do traditional materials characterization techniques translate to the nanoscale?
  • What are the latest developments in characterization software?
  • Unique nanoparticle size characterization technology
  • Has characterization proved that nanopowders don’t really exist?
  • Which techniques, software programs and machines are best suited to the nanoscale?
  • Can you ensure that particles are dispersed properly through characterization?

Speakers

3:05 pm

Short Break
3:05 pm - 3:15 pm

The car, marine and aerospace industries utilise iron, aluminum, plastic, steel, glass, rubber, petroleum products, copper and other materials that can be costly, heavy, inefficient and unsustainable. Lightweighting reduces the resource required for movement but must be integrated without compromising on performance or safety. The impact of finding the right materials is huge, for example thermoplastic composite parts weigh up to 40% less than conventional aluminium parts or other metal parts.

The challenge is not insignificant, for example battery-electric trucks are 2,500 to 5,000 pounds heavier than diesel trucks for the same duty cycle. Our panel of experts will take this opportunity to examine promising advanced materials including composites, technical ceramics and nanomaterials such as Graphene, when applied across those transport applications in need of ever-lighter materials.

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • Lightweighting – which materials perform best – at a lighter weight – safely?
    • What do composites offer in automotive lightweighting?
    • Comparing technical ceramics for lightweighting applications – what are advantages and pitfalls?
    • What are the latest developments in Graphene as part of the material toolkit for lightweighting?
  • Where are the greatest challenges in lightweighting?
  • Which components like the battery are seemingly impossible to reduce the weight of and where should we be looking for solutions?
  • What comes top of the list when it comes to lightweighting?  Safety? Performance? Cost? Sustainability? Is there any flexibility in these needs?

Additive manufacturing alone is revolutionizing product-based industries. Combine this method with digital technology and you can achieve a layer-by-layer fabrication approach in order to produce 3D products with complex geometries. For example the digital printing of chemically synthesized colloidal nanoparticles is enabling a class of designer nanomaterials with exacting properties driven by the nanoparticles and their interactions – down to the atomic level. 

Despite the excitement around these possibilities for additive manufacturing, especially when combined with digital or nano technology. What are the latest developments, where is it being applied at commercial scale and where are the opportunities for innovation in this fast moving sector?

*This session includes up to three short talks, followed by an extended 30 minute minimum panel discussion between all the listed speakers/ panellists addressing the key topics listed and audience questions

Key topics:

  • Where is additive manufacturing having the greatest impact for advanced materials manufacturing?
  • How can additive manufacturing open the door for smaller R&D pioneers?
  • What can we expect from digitization, nanotech and AM combined? What are the barriers to uptake and is it close to commercial use?
  • How has and will diversity in customer demand affect customization of materials?
  • What could additive manufacturing mean for waste?